Conway Cemetery State Park
On June 15, 1836, James Sevier Conway (1796-1855), surveyor, planter, and prominent citizen of territorial Arkansas, took office as the state's first governor. The park's major feature is Governor Conway's
final resting place in the family cemetery, on the Conway family's former home and cotton plantation called "Walnut Hill." National Register of Historic Places
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Crater of Diamonds State Park
Diamonds were discovered here in 1906 and, since then, more than 75,000 diamonds have been unearthed. This is the only diamond mine in the world that is open to the public. Notable diamond finds include the
40.23-carat "Uncle Sam," the largest diamond ever unearthed in the United States; and the 3.03-carat "Strawn-Wagner Diamond" that was cut to a 1.09-carat gem graded "D" flawless O/O/O, or perfect, the highest grade the American Gem Society can award. National Register of Historic Places
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Crowley's Ridge State Park
This park includes structures built by the Civilian Conservation Corps in the 1930s, with a group area, a large and impressive two-story pavilion, and an amphitheater designed to seat 1,000. The trail around
CCC-built Lake Ponder features exhibits about the CCC work. National Register of Historic Places
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Davidsonville Historic State Park
Established in 1815 on the banks of the Black River, this important frontier town had Arkansas Territory's first post office, courthouse, and land office. When bypassed by the Southwest Trail from St. Louis to
Mexico, the town began to fade, and was virtually unoccupied by the 1830s. Because there has since been little disturbance, archeologists have recently uncovered the town three inches below ground. Finds include corners of buildings, streets, and a volume of artifacts, which are currently at the University of Arkansas being catalogued and preserved. National Register of Historic Places
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Devil's Den State Park
Devil's Den holds what has been called the most complete example of CCC park architecture in the state. Selected as a park site in 1933, Lee Creek Valley provided the native wood and stone that the Civilian
Conservation Corps used to craft the park's CCC/Rustic-style buildings and structures, including a native stone dam, a unique pavilion/restaurant/bathhouse, cabins in several styles and sizes, roads, trails, stone walls, bridges, and furniture. In 1994, when the park was being nominated for recognition by the National Registry of Historic Places, they determined that the park had so many qualifying structures that they designated the entire park as a Historic District.
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Herman Davis State Park
This monument honors Private Herman Davis, an Arkansas farm boy who was on General John J. Pershing's list of World War I's 100 great heroic stories. Davis received the Distinguished Service Cross, the Croix de
Guere and the Medaille Militaire awards from the American and French governments. This historic site includes Davis' final resting place. National Register of Historic Places
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Historic Washington State Park
Washington was a major stop on the legendary Southwest Trail that connected St. Louis, Missouri, to the nearby Red River and Mexico (later Texas). Sam Houston, Davy Crockett, and Jim Bowie each traveled
separately through Washington before they fought for Texas independence. Washington was site of the blacksmith shop where gifted blacksmith James Black made a weapon for Jim Bowie that would become famous as the "Bowie Knife." Today, Historic Washington is a restored 19th-century town with 45 historic structures. Classic examples of Southern Greek Revival, Federal, Gothic Revival, and Italianate architecture stand as a legacy to life in Washington from 1824 to 1889. You'll want to stroll the plank boardwalks along streets that have never been paved, and explore this tree-shaded town, Arkansas's premier pioneer village, that many call "the Colonial Williamsburg of the Southwest." National Register of Historic Places
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Historic Washington State Park
Washington was a major stop on the legendary Southwest Trail that connected St. Louis, Missouri, to the nearby Red River and Mexico (later Texas). Sam Houston, Davy Crockett, and Jim Bowie each traveled
separately through Washington before they fought for Texas independence. Washington was site of the blacksmith shop where gifted blacksmith James Black made a weapon for Jim Bowie that would become famous as the "Bowie Knife." Today, Historic Washington is a restored 19th-century town with 45 historic structures. Classic examples of Southern Greek Revival, Federal, Gothic Revival, and Italianate architecture stand as a legacy to life in Washington from 1824 to 1889. You'll want to stroll the plank boardwalks along streets that have never been paved, and explore this tree-shaded town, Arkansas's premier pioneer village, that many call "the Colonial Williamsburg of the Southwest."
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Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area
In 1858, the Van Winkle mill was established as the first steam-driven saw mill in northwest Arkansas, and was located just north of present day Highway 12 on the west fork of Little Clifty Creek. During the
1870's it was the largest sawmill in the entire state. Most of the Victorian-type homes seen today in Fayetteville, Bentonville, and Eureka Springs were made from lumber cut at the Van Winkle mill. In addition, the majority of the lumber used to construct "Old Main" at the University of Arkansas came from the Van Winkle mill. When Maj. Gen. Earl Van Dorn retreated from the battle of Pea Ridge with the majority of the Confederate Army of the West, he stopped at the Van Winkle mill to take advantage of the newly added grist feature, grinding corn to make hardtack for the soldiers. > National Register of Historic Places
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Jacksonport State Park
Steamboats made Jacksonport a thriving river port in the 1800s. During the Civil War, both confederate and Union troops vied for control of the town because of its crucial river locale. Jacksonport became
county seat in 1854, but construction of a courthouse was delayed until 1869. The 1872 courthouse preserved here is one of the finest historic restorations in the mid-South. Events and programs tell the story of this historic river port. National Register of Historic Places
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Lake Catherine State Park
Five of the 18 cabins in this park, plus the nature center, are beautiful examples of log and stone CCC construction from the 1930s. Lake Catherine was one of Arkansas's first state parks, established in 1935.
National Register of Historic Places
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Louisiana Purchase State Park
Deep in this east Arkansas swamp is the initial point from which all surveys of the Louisiana Purchase of 1803 initiated. Walking the boardwalk you'll experience the beauty of the swamp. Wayside exhibits tell
about the Louisiana Purchase, and describe the flora and fauna.
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Mammoth Spring State Park
Arkansas's only National Natural Landmark, Mammoth Spring, is Arkansas's largest spring and the 10th largest in the world. The spring flows nine million gallons of water each hour, forming a 10-acre lake, then
flowing south creating the Spring River, a popular trout and float stream.
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Mammoth Spring State Park
Frisco Depot at Mammoth Spring State ParkThe 1885 Kansas City, Fort Scott, and Memphis Railroad Depot, now called by its last operating name, the "Frisco Depot," is the oldest depot remaining in Arkansas. This
charming Queen Anne-style structure, fully restored and interpreted through exhibits, is one of only a few depots in Arkansas, as well as the nation, that have been restored as a museum dedicated to interpreting its role as a train depot.  National Register of Historic Places
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Mount Nebo State Park
Rising 1,350 feet, Mount Nebo offers sweeping views of the Arkansas River Valley. Native stone and logs from Mount Nebo were used by the Civilian Conservation Corps to construct many of the park's bridges,
trails, rustic-style cabins, and a grand pavilion overlooking the valley below. National Register of Historic Places
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Parkin Archeological State Park
A 17-acre Mississippian Period Native American village was here from A.D. 1000 to 1550. A large platform mound on the St. Francis riverbank remains, and archeologists continue their discoveries below ground.
Many scholars believe the Parkin site is the Native American village of Casqui, visited by Hernando de Soto in 1541.
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Petit Jean State Park
Petit Jean's three National Historic Districts list over 80 buildings, trails, bridges, and beautiful Mather Lodge on the bluff overlooking scenic Cedar Creek Canyon. The bluffs, waterfalls and vistas of Petit
Jean Mountain inspired the creation of Arkansas's state park system. The CCC work here is an outstanding example of CCC/Rustic Style architecture and mirrors the mountain's rugged beauty as the native log and stone structures seem to rise from the earth.
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Powhatan Historic State Park
Powhatan's 1888 courthouse, 1873 jail, 1840s Ficklin-Imboden log house, 1888 telephone exchange building, and a unique 1880s two-room schoolhouse, are all on their original foundations and each is on the
National Register of Historic Places. Restored to the architect's original plans, the courthouse archives some of the oldest records in Arkansas.
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Prairie Grove Battlefield State Park
Prairie Grove is recognized by the American Battlefield Protection Program as one of the most intact Civil War battlefields in the nation. The park protects the battle site of the Battle of Prairie Grove, where
on December 7, 1862, the Confederate Army of the Trans-Mississippi clashed with the Union Army of the Frontier in a day of fierce fighting resulting in 2,700 casualties. National Register of Historic Places
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Queen Wilhelmina State Park
The "Wonder House" is a stone vacation cabin built in 1931 by Carlos Hill. This unusual structure has nine levels and was designed to take advantage of the scenic views and cooler temperatures high atop the
state's second highest mountain. National Register of Historic Places
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Toltec Mounds Archeological State Park
Arkansas's tallest remaining prehistoric Native American Indian mounds, the remains of a large ceremonial complex inhabited from A.D. 650 to 1050, are preserved at this National Historic Landmark site just 20
minutes east of Little Rock.
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Village Creek State Park
Within the rolling hills and forests of this 7,000-acre park is a section of the Trail of Tears listed on the National Register of Historic Places. This segment of the old Memphis-to-Little Rock Road is cut
deep into the Crowley's Ridge soil and has been touted as the most dramatic remaining section of the Indian Removal route.
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