Davidsonville Historic State Park
Established in 1815 on the banks of the Black River, Davidsonville is one of the most important historic towns of Arkansas and the epitome of American frontier life. It was home to Arkansas Territory's first
post office, courthouse and land office. When bypassed by the Southwest Trail from St. Louis to Mexico, the town began to fade, and was virtually unoccupied by the 1830s. Because there has since been little disturbance, archeologists have recently uncovered the town three inches below ground. Finds include corners of buildings, streets, and a volume of artifacts, which are currently at the University of Arkansas being catalogued and preserved.
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Historic Washington State Park
Historic Washington is a restored 19th-century town with 45 historic structures. Historic Washington stands out among historic villages of Arkansas 1900. From its establishment in 1824, Washington was an
important stop on the rugged Southwest Trail to Mexico, and later, Texas. James Bowie, Sam Houston and Davy Crockett each traveled through Washington at various times. Stroll the plank boardwalks along streets that have never been paved, and explore this tree-shaded historic town many call "the Colonial Williamsburg of the Southwest." Come enjoy a step back to American frontier life. The Arkansas Famous and Historic Tree Program was established in 1997 to create an appreciation for historic trees in Arkansas. Some trees have cultural significance, such as the Royston magnolia at Historic Washington State Park. A committee of landscape, forestry, and historic preservation specialists determine trees eligible for listing. For further information, visit: www.arhistorictrees.org.
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Louisiana Purchase State Park
This National Historic Landmark at the junction of Lee, Monroe and Phillips counties preserves the initial point from which all surveys of the property acquired from the French through the Louisiana Purchase of
1803 initiated.  The L’Anguille Chapter of the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution in Marianna placed a granite marker at the initial point in 1926 following the discovery by two surveyors, in 1921, of the gum trees that were marked by the initial surveyors back in 1815.  As you walk along the boardwalk, you'll experience the captivating beauty and natural sounds of the surrounding swamp. Along the boardwalk, interpretive wayside exhibits tell about the Louisiana Purchase and describe the wild flora and fauna of the swamp. This headwater swamp is representative of the swamplands that were common in eastern Arkansas before the vast bottomlands were drained and cleared for farming and commercial purposes. The Arkansas Famous and Historic Tree Program was established in 1997 to create an appreciation for historic trees in Arkansas. Some trees have cultural significance, while others are important in ecological history, such as the cypress/tupelo community at Louisiana Purchase State Park. A committee of landscape, forestry, and historic preservation specialists determine trees eligible for listing. For further information, visit: www.arhistorictrees.org
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Powhatan Historic State Park
In the late 1800s, this busy river port on the Black River was the shipping point for a large territory, which served many of Arkansas historic towns and villages. In 1888, a Victorian courthouse was built.
Restored to the architect's original plans, the courthouse today serves as a regional archive that contains some of the oldest records in Arkansas. Tour the 1888 courthouse, 1873 Powhatan jail, 1840s Ficklin-Imboden house, 1888 telephone exchange building, and a unique 1880s two-room schoolhouse, all on their original foundations.
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