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  • Day use Facilities: Picnic Area, Restrooms
  • Park settings: River

Bull Shoals-White River State Park

In north central Arkansas amidst the natural beauty of the Ozark Mountains, Bull Shoals-White River State Park stretches along the riverside and lakeshore where the White River and Bull Shoals Lake join at the Bull Shoals dam. Together these waters form one of the nation’s finest fishing and boating combinations. The White River is renowned as mid-America’s premier trout stream, famous for its record rainbow and brown trout. Bull Shoals Dam forms Bull Shoals Lake, Arkansas’s largest lake with 45,440 acres of waters stretching along Arkansas's northern border and into southern Missouri. Anglers are drawn to the lake's catches of lunker bass, catfish, crappie, and bream. Water sports enthusiasts can enjoy boating and swimming in these clear open waters.

Cane Creek State Park

Located where the rolling terrain of the West Gulf Coastal Plain and the alluvial lands of east Arkansas's Mississippi Delta meet, this park offers you the opportunity to explore two of Arkansas's distinct natural settings in one visit. Hike or bike the park's 2,053 acres of woodlands in the Coastal Plain. Paddle or fish on 1,675-acre Cane Creek Lake, a timbered Delta lake, and experience the lush beauty and abundant wildlife that inhabit Arkansas's Mississippi Delta. Just across the timber-filled lake, anglers and paddlers can also explore Bayou Bartholomew, the world's longest bayou.

Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area

This park-natural area stretches for 12 miles along the wild and scenic Cossatot River, Arkansas's premier whitewater experience renowned as the best whitewater float stream in mid-America. Located in southwest Arkansas south of Mena, the Cossatot forms Cossatot Falls, a rugged and rocky canyon that challenges the most experienced canoeists and kayakers with its Class IV and V rapids. When the water is high, the paddlers are here. This National Wild and Scenic River is a watershed basin with flow levels dependent on rainfall. After significant precipitation, the river level rises, allowing experienced paddlers the opportunity to test their skills in challenging Class IV and V whitewater. At the river's Cossatot Falls area, a rocky canyon with distinct ledges, the river drops 33 feet in elevation within 1/3 of a mile. Late winter to early spring is peak whitewater paddling season here. Class III-V whitewater is for experts only. Floatable river levels are usually limited to late-fall, winter and spring.

Crater of Diamonds State Park

Arkansas's diamond site, the Crater of Diamonds State Park, is the eighth largest diamond-bearing deposit in surface area in the world. Here you can enjoy the one-of-a-kind outdoor adventure of prospecting for real diamonds. Located in southwest Arkansas near Murfreesboro, this is the world's only diamond-bearing site open to the public. Occurring naturally here along with the diamonds are garnet, amethyst, jasper, agate, quartz, and other rocks and minerals that make this site a rock-hound's delight. And what you unearth is yours to keep. You'll search over a 37 1/2-acre plowed field, the eroded surface of the ancient volcanic pipe that brought the gems to the surface.

Daisy State Park

In this scenic setting in the foothills of the Ouachita Mountain, Lake Greeson, the Little Missouri River, and Daisy State Park make a winning combination for outdoor enthusiasts. Lake Greeson, 7,000 acres of clear water and mountain scenery, delights water enthusiasts. Catches of black and white bass, stripers, crappie, catfish, and bluegill account for its popularity with anglers.Daisy State Park is 1/4 mile south of Daisy off U.S. 70. [NOTE: For eastbound travelers on U.S. 70, some GPS units direct you to turn right on West Park Road to access the park. Disregard this instruction and continue traveling east on U.S. 70 approximately 1/4-mile further to East Park Road. This is the entrance to the park.]

Davidsonville Historic State Park

This park preserves the site of historic Davidsonville. Established in 1815, the town included the Arkansas Territory's first post office, courthouse, and land office. Bypassed by the Southwest Trail, an overland route from St. Louis to the border of Mexico, the town faded by the 1830s. Today, archeologists are uncovering remarkable finds of streets, foundations, and objects that tell a fascinating story of life on the Arkansas frontier following the Louisiana Purchase. Park exhibits and interpretive tours provide information about this important frontier town.

DeGray Lake Resort State Park

Arkansas's resort state park lies on the north shore of DeGray Lake, a 13,800-acre fishing and water sports destination in the foothills of the Ouachita Mountains. Here you will find resort amenities combined with plenty of outdoor fun. DeGray offers a 94-room lodge and convention center, 113 campsites (Class B) and three Rent-A-Yurts, swimming, tennis, golf, hiking, bicycling and guided horseback trail rides. The park's full-service marina (open year-round) offers tackle, dock space, fuel and a wide variety of boat rentals.

Devil's Den State Park

Devil's Den State Park is nestled deep in Lee Creek Valley, a picturesque setting in northwest Arkansas's Ozarks Mountains, ancient sedimentary mountains renowned for their natural beauty and lush oak-hickory forest. This Ozark valley was selected as a park site in the 1930s by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). The CCC used native materials to craft the park’s rustic-style wood and stone structures. This work includes an impressive native stone dam that spans Lee Creek in the heart of the park forming peaceful eight-acre Lake Devil. Rental canoes and pedal boats are available at the park. Hiking, backpacking, and mountain bike trails lead to backcountry areas in Devil's Den State Park and the surrounding Ozark National Forest.

Jacksonport State Park

In the 1800s steamboats made Jacksonport a thriving river port. During the Civil War, the town was occupied by both Confederate and Union forces because of its crucial locale. Jacksonport became county seat in 1854, and construction of a stately, two-story brick courthouse began in 1869. The town began to decline in the 1880s when bypassed by the railroad. The county seat was moved in 1891 to nearby Newport, and Jacksonport's stores, wharves and saloons soon vanished. Today, exhibits in the park's 1872 courthouse and programs by park interpreters share the story of this historic river port. Admission to the courthouse is free.

Lake Catherine State Park

Nestled in the natural beauty of the Ouachita Mountains on 1,940-acre Lake Catherine, one of the five popular Diamond Lakes in the Hot Springs area, Lake Catherine State Park features CCC/Rustic Style facilities constructed of native stone and wood by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in the 1930s. Situated along the lakeshore are the park's 20 cabins that feature fully-equipped kitchens. Most have wood-burning fireplaces.

Lake Dardanelle State Park

Surrounded by the natural beauty for which the Arkansas River Valley is known, Lake Dardanelle is a sprawling 34,300-acre reservoir on the Arkansas River. These two water resources combined here have put this area into the national spotlight as a major bass fishing tournament site. Lake Dardanelle State Park offers two areas on the lake: one park site is at Russellville, and the other is located at nearby Dardanelle. Both the Russellville (main park) and Dardanelle locations offer camping (74 sites: Russellville--16 Class AAA, 13 Class AA, and 27 Class B; Dardanelle Area--18 Class B), launch ramps, standard pavilions, picnic sites, restrooms, and bathhouses with hot showers.

Lake Ouachita State Park

Surrounded by the Ouachita National Forest, Lake Ouachita is known for its scenic natural beauty and the clarity of its waters. These pristine waters form the largest manmade lake within Arkansas's borders. Named one of the cleanest lakes in America, 40,000-acre Lake Ouachita is a water sports mecca for swimming, skiing, scuba diving, boating, and fishing. Angling for bream, crappie, catfish, stripers, and largemouth bass can be enjoyed in open waters or quiet coves along the lake's 975 miles of shoreline. Located just a short drive from the spa city of Hot Springs on the lake's eastern shore, Lake Ouachita State Park is your gateway to this popular water sports lake.

Mammoth Spring State Park

Mammoth Spring is Arkansas's largest spring and the second largest spring in the Ozark Mountains. A National Natural Landmark, the spring flows nine million gallons of water hourly. Forming a scenic 10-acre lake, it then flows south as the Spring River, a popular Ozark trout and float stream. Located near the spring, the park's 1886 Frisco depot will take you back in time to an early 1900s train station. Parked just outside the train station is a Frisco caboose to explore, too. Admission to the Frisco Depot and Frisco caboose are free.

Mississippi River State Park

Beginning May 1, 2009, Arkansas State Parks took over the management and operation of the 253-acre Bear Creek Recreation Area of the St. Francis National Forest. Arkansas State Parks’ camping rules and regulations apply at the Beech Point Campground, Lone Pine Campground, and Maple Flat Campground on Bear Creek Lake. Campers should register at the visitor center (on Ark. 44 three miles southeast of Marianna) before occupying a campsite. The center is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. For campers who arrive after hours, there are self-pay stations located at the campgrounds. Make campsite reservations by calling the park office at: 870-295-4040. Make reservations by calling the park at: 870-295-4040.

Moro Bay State Park

You'll find one of the most popular fishing and water sport areas in south central Arkansas where Moro Bay and Raymond Lake join the Ouachita River at Moro Bay State Park. Park facilities include 20 campsites (five Class A and 15 Class B), picnic sites, a store, marina with boat rentals and gas pump, standard pavilion (screened), playground, trails, and the Moro Bay Ferry exhibit featuring a historic tugboat and barge. Five new rental cabins opened in the park in late-2009. Each cabin is fully-equipped and features a great room, kitchen, two bedrooms, and two bathrooms. These 1,100-square-foot cabins include both a screened porch and outside living area with a picnic grill and table that face the waters of Moro Bay. One cabin is a barrier-free design to meet the needs of visitors with disabilities.

Parkin Archeological State Park

Parkin Archeological State Park in eastern Arkansas at Parkin preserves and interprets the Parkin site on the St. Francis River where a 17-acre Mississippi Period, American Indian village was located from A.D. 1000 to 1550. A large platform mound on the river bank remains. The site is important for understanding the history and prehistory of northeast Arkansas. There were once many archeological sites similar to Parkin throughout this region, but they did not survive as eastern Arkansas was settled.

Pinnacle Mountain State Park

Pinnacle Mountain is a day-use park dedicated to environmental education, outdoor recreation, and preservation. Located just west of Little Rock, this natural environment of 2,351 acres was set aside in 1977 as Arkansas's first state park adjoining a major metropolitan area. The park features a rich diversity of natural habitat, from high upland peaks to bottomlands along the Big Maumelle River and Little Maumelle River, for park visitors to experience. And, here among this natural diversity park interpreters and volunteers help visitors and students understand man's relationship to the environment. Special interpretive programs conducted by the park interpreters may be scheduled by contacting the park.

Powhatan Historic State Park

In the 1800s, this busy river port on the Black River was the chief shipping point for a large territory. In 1888, high on a hill overlooking the busy riverfront, an Italianate-style courthouse was built from bricks made on site. Dramatically, the courthouse was placed high atop the first rocky ridge at the eastern edge of the Ozarks. The two-story courthouse was erected on the foundation of the original courthouse, completed in 1873, that burned in 1885. Restored in 1970 to the architect's original plans, the Victorian courthouse is this state park's dominant feature. A 2005 state-of-the-art renovation of the courthouse's interior was based on research, paint analysis and historical documentation.

Withrow Springs State Park

In the heart of the Ozark Mountains and cradled by the limestone bluffs of the War Eagle Creek, Withrow Springs State Park is a peaceful setting of unspoiled natural beauty and many outdoor recreational choices. Camping enthusiasts will enjoy the park's campground nestled in shaded woods. Choose from 30 Class AAA campsites (with water, up to 50 amp service, and sewer hookups). Each campsite can accommodate either an RV and/or a tent. The campground also features a modern, barrier-free bathhouse.



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View or download the Arkansas State Parks Facilities chart to find out more information on each individual park, then find them on the Arkansas state map below to plan your next state park getaway in Arkansas.